Student skill sharing

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  • University of Michigan School of Information students during Alternative Spring Break dinner.
    University of Michigan School of Information students during Alternative Spring Break dinner.
  • Dearborn, Mich. — Students minds wander to beaches, reading beneath shade trees and climbing the tallest mountain this time of the year.

    The fortunate ones who haven’t already tossed their caps into the air are testing classroom lessons outside scholastic walls.

    Earlier this year University of Michigan School of Information students, with the Ford Community Corps, put their knowledge into action across the United States. Twenty-seven non-profits benefitted from a full week’s work during this year’s Alternative Spring Break.

    If the School of Information is new to your ears, likely you are not alone. According to Alissa Talley-Pixley, Career Development & Engaged Learning Coordinator, University of Michigan School of Information, the school is becoming more widely known.

    Roots of the student’s work are deep in the School’s 1927 beginning as the UM Department of Library Science. However, this is not a stagnate undergraduate program. A master’s and Ph.D. program replaced the first program. Later the department became a School, then in 1986 another dust-preventative name change: School of Information and Library Science. The addition of a Bachelors Information program allows students to bring interests into one degree.

    “I never knew that my interest in technology and graphic design could be combined into one degree,” students commonly tell Talley-Pixley.

    Each of the nine projects in Detroit and 17 in Chicago had one or two students during the week and a trio of students worked with Los Angeles’ Homeboy Industries.

    The Heidelberg Project benefitted from student’s website insights. Prompting a Heidelberg representative at the post-ASB dinner to tell Talley-Pixley, ‘It is amazing what the students have done in a week–they are bringing such creativity to our website.’

    Similarly, Talley-Pixley heard from the Detroit Ledger after their data reorganization. ‘When we have such a dedicated student, it helps motivate our team to work on projects that we often don’t get to, but that are priorities.’

    Program alums at the post-ASB dinner helpfully answered student questions and the mentor-mentee relationships clearly began.

  • University of Michigan School of Information students during Alternative Spring Break dinner.
  • University of Michigan School of Information students during Alternative Spring Break dinner.
  • Alternative Spring Break dinner.